Introduction

In the Boland, amongst the endangered fynbos and several species of proteas, you’ll find a small 24ha boutique winery called Druk My Niet. This is where we make wine the environmentally friendly way.

Our winery is situated in a biosphere reserve and we choose to use only sustainable farming methods. We’re a proud member of the Biodiversity Initiative.

Over the years our wine cellar has grown to an 80 tonne boutique winery with state of the art machinery and equipment. In 2012 we sold a total of 8051 bottles of wine – 60% of which we exported to
international wine lovers.

Our boutique wines are allowed to ripen at their own pace and our self-catering cottages are there for you to relax and unwind.

History

Our farm used to be a part of Kleinbosch Farm and was bought by Huguenot Francois du Toit in 1692. In 2002 the Kirchners bought the farm and began a six year period of renovation and replanting of the estate together with Malherbe Rust Architects and Future Growth Landscapers. This renovation included returning to their former glory some of the oldest buildings in the Paarl valley. 

The old cellar, which was built in 1692, was converted into a more modern 80 tonne cellar. We renovated the original historical open fermenter and installed new steel tanks. In 2008 the first wine, Mapoggo White, was produced on the farm. Mapoggo Red followed in 2009. Between 2008 and 2013 we have produced 6 award winning wines here at Druk My Niet. 

The People

Our farm’s owners, Mr and Mrs Kirchner, originally lived in Germany. After having travelled all over the world they finally found their home at Druk My Niet. They have been living on the farm since 2007. 

In August 2016 Alexandra Mcfarlane was appointed as the new wine maker. Shewill continue with the Druk My Niet Philosophy and style of wine making that we are known and loved for. 

Our dedicated team is led by James Johansen, our foreman. James has been working on the farm since 2002. Without the efforts of James and his team our farm would not be the great estate that it is today.